According to the government, the man in question is a United States citizen who went to Syria and joined the Islamic State. Kurdish forces captured him in September, and he was handed over to the U.S. military on September 14. The authorities refuse to identify the man, and he has not been before a judge or in a courtroom since his detention.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is attempting to intervene on the man’s behalf. Yesterday U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan took a dim view of the Department of Justice’s excuses for keeping the man hidden at a secret prison in Iraq.

The Washington Post describes Chutkan’s reaction to the Justice Department’s arguments:

“How on earth is the man to exercise his habeas rights,” and contest being held, Chutkan at one point asked attorneys for the government at an hour-long hearing. The judge said their position suggested “an end-run” around the Constitution by saying in effect “You don’t get to exercise your habeas rights until we decide what to do with you.”

ACLU attorney Jonathan Hafetz called the government’s position “Kafkaesque” and “a direct assault” on the authority established by the U.S. Supreme Court during George W. Bush’s presidency for U.S. citizens suspected of belonging to al-Qaeda and other terrorist groups after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks to challenge detentions after being captured on the battlefield.

The Supreme Court ruled in 2004 in Hamdi v. Rumsefeld that U.S. citizens being held as enemy combatants still retain the right to due process and to challenge their classifications as combatants. The Pentagon has disclosed (after being ordered by this judge to do so) that the man has requested a lawyer. That attorney has not yet been provided.

The behavior here by the Pentagon and Department of Justice is pretty repulsive, but the fact that the case involves a U.S. citizen who has apparently joined ISIS means it’s not likely to inspire much public outrage. Nevertheless, the purpose of due process is to guarantee the rights of those accused of even the most egregious of crimes. This guy has a right to a lawyer and a court hearing.

Read more about the case from the ACLU here.